Day 113 — Publishing our App

This Week: Sprint 16

My focus this week is on getting ready for our public app launch. Here are some of the activities I’ll be doing:

  • Reaching out to advocacy groups.
  • Getting feedback on the app.
  • Getting permission to use videos.
  • Making app tweaks.
  • Testing out Tik Tok marketing.

Today’s Work: Publishing the App

Over the weekend, we merged the latest updates to our app. So that we have some time to identify new issues, today I published the latest version to Apple and Google Play stores.

Here’s how it works.

1— Releasing to Apple

Step 1 — Building the IPA

Using Expo, it’s pretty easy to build app files. For Apple, that first means creating an .ipa file.

expo build:ios
Monitoring the Build Status in Expo (why? I don’t know, but it sure is pretty.)

Step 2 — Uploading the App via Transporter

Once the .ipa file is created, I download the file and open the Transporter app on my computer. Transporter does exactly like the name describes…it “transports” the app bundle to the Apple App store.

Uploading to App Store Connect via Transporter

Step 3 — Configuring the App in Test Flight

Once Transporter has done its job, it takes a bit of time for the app to appear in the Apple Store (I wasn’t counting, but generally I set it down for about 10–30 minutes and come back to it later). I’ve found the App store to be pretty clunky, so it took some getting used to. The first thing it asks you is to add “compliance” information — basically that you use standard encryption on the app.

Step 4 — Pushing the Update

Then comes the next confusing part of the UX: the app won’t be reviewed until you actually add testers to the build.

Apple used to have a 24 hour waiting period for these beta apps, but for the past 6 months or so approval has been automatic.

Step 5 — Install the Update

Now comes the best part: installing the latest update. Beta apps on iOS are managed through an app called, “Test Flight”.

2— Releasing to Android

The process for Android is very similar, only the app is uploaded to the Google Play Console and the beta app download is a bit easier since it doesn’t require a separate app.

Step 1 — Building the APK

This is exactly like iOS, only a slightly different command.

expo build:android

Step 2 — Uploading the App

Uploading the app for Android is a bit easier and can all be done through the command line. In this case:

expo upload:android

Step 3 — Configuring the App in Google Play

Our new app in the Google Play Store

Step 4 — Pushing the Update

Once that’s done, it’s time to push the update. I configure it for “open testing” so that anyone with the link or who searches Invincible can access it from the app store.

Configuring the App for Open Testing
Confirming Open Testing

Step 5 — Wait for Review

Unliked Apple, Google still requires review of Beta apps.

Luckily, it only took a few hours. I did find it takes a few more for the updated app to appear on the app store.

Step 6—Installing the Update

Unlike Apple, Google allows you to publish Beta apps to the Play Store. By selecting the “Open Testing” option, our app is searchable in the app store.

Want to give us some feedback?

Check out the app at invincibleapp.com/beta.

--

--

--

Startup founder surviving in his parent’s basement.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

What Is Wrong With Android Development?

Phone screen

Integrate Alan.app with flutter

Create a WalkieTalkie App using HUAWEI HMS Nearby Service in Xamarin.Android

Set lock screen background of album art in Android

Android Wireless Debugging Using Plugin or ADB

Cancellation in coroutines

Background BLE scan in DOZE mode on Android devices

Concatenate adapters sequentially with ConcatAdapter

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Bob Weishar

Bob Weishar

Startup founder surviving in his parent’s basement.

More from Medium

Why launching your MVP is not that big of a deal

The Exelerate team working on an MVP

Why build Reach in public?

Everything You Need To Know Before Building An MVP For Your Startup

Why being a jack of all trades is a great idea (for startups)